Labour Migration, Skills and Discrimination – by Dáire McCormack-George

Introduction In an earlier entry on this blog, Natalie Sedacca and Avril Sharp outlined the horrifying circumstances in which many domestic workers, as victims of human trafficking or ‘modern slavery’, often find themselves. My concern, […]

Dignity, not destitution: the impact of differential rights to work for migrant domestic workers – by Natalie Sedacca and Avril Sharp

This blog post presents some key findings and initial analysis of an empirical study on the impact of differential permission to work on migrant domestic workers in the UK. The study sought to address the […]

Protecting the right to strike in the ILO and the European Court of Human Rights: the significance of Appn No 44873/09 Ognevenko v Russia – Tonia Novitz

Freedom of association is a foundational principle of the International Labour Organisation (ILO). Not only is this principle recognised in the ILO Constitution, first established as Part XIII of the Treaty of Versailles, a century […]

A missing layer of the cake with the controversial icing – Hugh Collins

Last October, the President of the Supreme Court, Lady Hale, gave a lecture in the University of Oxford on the topic of ‘Equality and Human Rights’. After her eloquent and pellucid lecture, Lady Hale agreed […]

Philosophical Foundations of Labour Law Book Launch – Karon Monaghan

On Wednesday the 20th of February we launched the book Philosophical Foundations of Labour Law (Hugh Collins, Gillian Lester and Virginia Mantouvalou eds, OUP, 2018) at the Faculty of Laws, UCL. The event was introduced by Professor […]

Receding Confidence in Trust and Confidence? James-Bowen v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis – David Cabrelli

Introduction Although given the moniker of a ‘portmanteau obligation’ by Lord Nicholls in Malik v BCCI ([1998] AC 20 at 35A), there are undoubtedly limits to the operational capacity of the implied term and mutual trust […]

Work, Human Rights, and Extreme Poverty in the UK: On the Occasion of the Visit of the UN Special Rapporteur, Philip Alston – Virginia Mantouvalou

The UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and leading authority globally in international human rights law, Professor Philip Alston of NYU, published a statement on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, following his official visit in […]

Lift the Ban: A Right to Work for Asylum Seekers – Emmeline Plews

Last month Refugee Action published a report setting out the case for reforming the current restrictions on asylum seekers’ freedom to work in the UK. Supported by a coalition of over 80 NGOs, think tanks, […]

Do parents need a holiday? The Court of Justice rules on parental leave and holiday rights – Rebecca Zahn

On 4 October 2018, the Grand Chamber of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) handed down its judgment in Case C-12/17 Tribunalul Botoşani, Ministerul Justiţiei v Maria Dicu. The case has received […]

Collective voice in the gig economy: challenges, opportunities, solutions – Jeremias Prassl

The rapid growth of the gig or platform economy in Europe has triggered much discussion about the future of employment rights. A recent report to the ETUC focuses on a particularly important subset of issues […]